disney, inside out, childrens

Inside Out: A film for adults as much as kids

The story line follows the life of an 11 year old girl called Riley through a house move with her family, leaving everything she know her whole life far behind her in another state. We have already seen a few piece of Riley's past, seen from inside of her head from the people who run her emotions. When she was born she started with just Joy, someone who tried her best to give her only happy memories. As Riley grew up and experienced more, other people appeared in her head (fear, disgust, anger, sadness). As well as personality islands appearing as core memories shape who Riley will become.

Trying to cope with her new life Riley goes to school, trying to be the happy girl her parents want her to be. Sadness gets more control over Riley as everything starts to feel hopeless in her life. If sadness touches any of the memories in Riley's head she turns them into sad ones. As a new sad core memory is formed from Riley's first day of school, Joy and Sadness fight over control of the memory as Joy tries to keep it out of core memory but Sadness wants it inside. Leaving them both lost in Riley's mind with all of the core memories as Riley breaks apart slowly without them where they should be.

Although this film is made for children, adults will gain just as much pleasure from the work. As we go through all of Riley's emotions, to explore what really makes a human mind tick. How to balance all the different emotions to make a real living person work. It reminds me a lot of the Sim's computer games, where you have to balance every part of a person's life to keep them happy. The movie takes that basic form and converts it into an in-depth plot line surprising of the age group it is aimed at. Thoroughly enjoyable movie. One of the few children's movies you won't have to grin and bear it through. Still holding strong at the box office after nearly three months with the best part of $750 million gross takings.

sarah beth james

@wickedwitchgal

​first seen on thecinemarks.com